ART AND SCIENCE:

Publication Cover Art

Science Cover 1990 SCIENCE: March 1990

This micrograph shows interparticle collisions induced by ultrasound between tin and iron particles about 20 microns in size. The velocity of such collisions can be as high as 500 m/s (1100 mph). The elemental composition dot map was produced by scanning Auger electron spectroscopy and show tin in orange and iron in blue. [Courtesy of Kenneth S. Suslick and Stephen J. Doktycz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, on instrumentation in the Center for Microanalysis of Materials, from work funded by the National Science Foundation]

Doktycz, S. J.; Suslick, K. S. "Interparticle Collisions Driven by Ultrasound," Science, 1990, 247 1067-1069.

Science Cover 1991 SCIENCE: September 1991

High intensity ultrasound creates localized hot-spots in liquids through the process of cavitation: the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles. Local heating produces excited states of diatomic carbon (C2) from hydrocarbons; these states emit light just as they do in a flame. The image of such sonoluminescence from a vibrating titanium rod (1 cm diameter) is shown in false-color. The temperature created in cavitation hot-spots, determined from the spectrum of this emission, is ~5000 K. [Photograph by J. A. Gray, K. A. Kemper, and K. S. Suslick in the Department of Chemistry of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; from work funded by the National Science Foundation.]

Flint, E. B.; Suslick, K. S. "The Temperature of Cavitation," Science 1991, 253, 1397-1399.

MRS Cover 1995 MRS BULLETIN: April 1995

False-color image of the scanning electron micrograph of nanophase, amorphous iron prepared by the ultrasonic irradiation of iron pentacarbonyl solutions. The micrograph shows the porous, coral-like structure formed from nanometer-sized clusters created during acoustic cavitation. The amorphous iron is an extremely soft ferromagnetic material with high catalytic activity. Magnification of the cover image is approximately 100,000. The micrograph was obtained on a Hitachi S800 SEM in the UIUC Center for Microanalysis of Materials, which is supported by the US Department of Energy. Courtesy of Kenneth S. Suslick, Mark W. Grinstaff, and James A. Gray, School of Chemical Sciences, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Supramolecular Chemistry 1998 SUPRAMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY: September 1998

X-ray crystal structure of a supramolecular network of an octahydroxyporphyrin: 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3',5'-dihydroxy-phenyl)porphine. Symmetrically substituted octa-hydroxy porphyrins have been developed as solid-state building blocks for nanoporous materials. The position of the peripheral hydroxyl groups, the choice of metallo- or free base porphyrin, and the nature of the solvate (i.e., guest) dramatically influence structural features. The channels are 0.65 x 0.65 nm between the columns, and the pore volume is exceptionally large at 56% of the unit cell. Courtesy of Kenneth S. Suslick, P. Bhyrappa, and Scott R. Wilson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Bhyrappa, P.; Suslick, K. S. "Surpramolecular Networks of Octahydroxy Porphyrins," Supramolec. Chem., 1998, 9, 169-174.

Nature Cover 2002 NATURE: 25 July 2002

When a gas bubble in a liquid is excited by ultrasonic acoustic waves, it can emit short flashes of light suggestive of extreme temperatures inside the bubble. These flashes of light, known as 'sonoluminescence', occur as the bubble implodes, or cavitates. Now Didenko and Suslick show that chemical reactions occur during cavitation of a single, isolated bubble,and they go on to determine the yield of photons, radicals, and ions formed. (Photo credit: Kenneth S. Suslick and Kenneth J. Kolbeck)

Didenko, Y.; Suslick, K. S. "The Energy Efficiency of Formation of Photons, Radicals, and Ions During Single Bubble Cavitation" Nature 2002, 418, 394-397.

The Journal of Physical Chemistry 2006 J. PHYS. CHEM. A: August 2006

Sudden and dramatic changes in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) intensity and spectral profiles occur at a critical acoustic pressure for solutions of sulfuric acid containing mixtures of air and noble gas. This intense SBSL is due to a plasma. (See p. 9315, “Plasma Quenching by Air during Single-bubble Sonoluminescence”; Photo courtesy of David J. Flannigan and Kenneth S. Suslick.)

Flannigan, D. J.; Suslick, K. S. "Plasma Quenching by Air during Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence" J. Phys. Chem. A, 2006 110, 9315-9318.

Accounts of Chemical Research 2019 ACCOUNTS OF CHEMICAL RESEARCH: October 2018

In "The Chemical History of a Bubble", we explore the consequences of acoustic cavitation in liquids, i.e., sonochemistry and sonoluminescences. With apologies to Michael Faraday.

Suslick, K. S.; Eddingsaas, N. C.; Flannigan, D. J.; Hopkins, S. D.; Xu, H. "The Chemical History of a Bubble" Accts. Chem. Res., 2018, 51, 2169-2178. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.accounts.8b00088


 




THE SCIENCE

THE GROUP THE MAÎTRE D' LAGNIAPPE:
A  LITTLE  EXTRA
Overview Suslick Group
Members
Full CV
List of Publications
with PDFs
Words of
Humor and
Wisdom
Research
Group
Description
Group
Photo
Galleries
Most
Cited
Publications
A Chemist
Meets Hollywood
Executive
Summary:
Sonochemistry
"The Seminar
on
Seminars"
"Time flies like a banana" (Group Reunion Talk) A Chemist
In Court
Executive
Summary:
Smell-Seeing
Safety
Resources
"Chymistes:
The Distillers
of Waters"
Laws of
the Universe
Introduction
to
Sonochemistry
Construction
of CLS
Expert Witness
& Consulting
Cartoons of
Humor and
Wisdom
Executive
Summary:
Metalloporph.
Press
Clippings
Publication
Cover Art
Sculpture
and
Masks

 

 
Nature Cover 2002


Science Cover 1990


Science Cover 1991


Accounts Cover 2018


MRS Cover 1995


Supramolecular Chemistry 1998


The Journal of Physical Chemistry 2006
 
Nature Cover 2002


Science Cover 1990


Science Cover 1991


Accounts Cover 2018


MRS Cover 1995


Supramolecular Chemistry 1998


The Journal of Physical Chemistry 2006